Natural Breast Enhancement Forums

Full Version: How to Lighten Your Eye Color Naturally
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Okay so I'm going to use one TABLEspoon of honey, 6 TABLEspoons of water and 1 tablespoon of lemon? I put them all together then boil them? Or boil water first then add them? Are my measurements right? Should this be table spoon or teaspoon? Because I'm reading all kinds of measurements! I want to be exact and not have so much honey in my eye but at the same time see fast results ? HELP!?!
(26-03-2013, 02:26 AM)turkishgypsy Wrote: [ -> ]Okay so I'm going to use one TABLEspoon of honey, 6 TABLEspoons of water and 1 tablespoon of lemon? I put them all together then boil them? Or boil water first then add them? Are my measurements right? Should this be table spoon or teaspoon? Because I'm reading all kinds of measurements! I want to be exact and not have so much honey in my eye but at the same time see fast results ? HELP!?!

What i do is never boil the honey with water. i put at least one tablespoon of honey in the container. Then I boil the water and add it with the honey in the container and mix it. Good luck. Smile
Hey all,

I'm new to these forums, and I decided to create an account in order to share some info I've gathered along the years, and hopefully clear up any misconceptions or questions that some of you who are just starting out may come across.

I've read a lot of misinformation on this thread, by people who are just trying to help and may not be aware of a few crucial things. I started using the honey/water recipe in 2008, and since then I've learned quite a bit from my mistakes, as well as from doing some research.
  • First and foremost, I would not advise anyone to use tap water or bottled water on their eyes. Tap water contains traces of a multitude of contaminants, even after boiled and filtered. This is why you want to use 100% pure H2O, which can likely be obtained at your local pharmacy, depending on where you live. Just look for distilled water. If you can't find it anywhere, you could resort to making your own distilled water at home by collecting the water vapor released from boiling water into a sterile container. Be careful not to burn yourself with the water vapor.

  • Most importantly, you do not want use regular supermarket-bought honey, even if they have an "organic" tag on them. This is often nothing more than a marketing gimmick. The type of honey you want to use is raw honey. Raw honey is pure, unprocessed, unpasteurized honey. You can usually tell them apart by looking at how milky the honey is. If the honey is very transparent and liquid, it's most likely pasteurized. Raw honey on the other hand tends to be very murky, opaque, and crystallizes faster than pasteurized honey. If your honey is fully or partially crystallized, it's still perfectly suitable for use.

  • Why should I use raw, non-pasteurized honey? Well it turns out that industrialized honey must look appealing to the customer, above all. Pasteurizing honey simply means that the honey is heated up to a very high temperature before being bottled. This serves to destroy yeast cells and delay the onset of crystallization in the honey.

  • So what if it's been heated up? All raw honey contains an enzyme called glucose oxidase. When honey is mixed with water (distilled water), This enzyme undergoes a reaction which produces hydrogen peroxide, which is the "bleaching" agent that lightens the color of your iris. However, when honey is heated up, this enzyme is destroyed, making pasteurized honey practically useless when it comes to its bleaching power. Using pasteurized honey will either delay your results or completely negate them.

  • Exposure to sunlight is a bad thing for both the honey and your honey/water solution (as well as your eyes!), since sunlight also destroys the honey's precious glucose oxidase. I was lucky to find a shop that sells raw honey directly from a farmer's market, where all bottles are kept in a cool, dark place. This is also something you should keep in mind when storing your honey jar and your solution container. No need to keep it in the fridge, unless it's really hot where you live.

  • What's the right honey/water mix? There isn't a rule-of-thumb ratio you should always use, as the most important factor is the resulting pH of your mixture. There are hundreds of types of honey out there, and they each have a different pH (between ~3 and ~5, they are all acidic). The glucose oxidase enzyme present in honey only produces hydrogen peroxide at pH levels between 5.5 and 7. This is why we have to mix water with the honey - it elevates the honey's pH, allowing the release of hydrogen peroxide. Since the pH of distilled water is 7 (neutral), high-pH honeys need less water in the mixture. Conversely, more acidic (lower pH) honeys need more water. You'll want your honey/water solution to have a pH as close to 5.5 as possible. The reason for this is because honey + water + the right pH is not all it takes for honey to release hydrogen peroxide. When the honey mixture comes in contact with your eyes, your tears will further elevate the pH of the solution to just the right level, on top of adding calcium (naturally present in tears) to the mix, which is essential to activate the glucose oxidase and break it down into hydrogen peroxide.

  • pH Test Strips These can be found at your local swimming pool shop. After preparing your honey/water solution, put a few drops of the mixture on the pH test strip. If the pH reads below ~5.5, add a more water. If it's above ~5.5, add more honey.

  • Do not boil the honey. Ever. Don't even mix it with hot or boiling water, or you'll destroy the honey's glucose oxidase. If your honey is crystallized or you're having trouble mixing it with water, you may heat up the water, but only to a lukewarm temperature in order to allow the honey to dissolve in the water.

  • Adding more honey to the mixture does not make the iris-lightening process go any faster. In fact it will either slow it down or not work at all. As we established above, the pH of the solution must be right so that hydrogen peroxide can be released. Adding too much honey will turn your solution too acidic, making it impossible to activate the glucose oxidase present in the honey and preventing the release of hydrogen peroxide.

  • What type of honey should I purchase? While there is no general rule of thumb on this, you'll want the honey with the highest concentration of glucose oxidase. This concentration depends on the type of flora the honey is derived from, the climate/weather, age and health of the bees, as well as the presence of pollutants such as herbicide/insecticide in the bee colony's habitat. Despite all this, it's generally accepted that (raw) Honeydew honey and Eucalyptus honey have some of the highest concentrations of this enzyme, although honeydew honey is more of a sure-shot in comparison to Eucalyptus honey.

  • Don't over-use it and don't over-dose. Stick to applying 2-3 drops per eye, 3 times a day, and leave your head facing up until the burning sensation ceases. Over-use of this mixture may cause eye irritation, which can lead to a more serious condition if used without moderation.

  • Clean out your eye-drop container at least once a week and sterilize it in boiling water (preferably distilled).
dianalynn - what was your eye color before you started using your method of honey and what color are they now. Do you have any before and after pictures that could be of inspiration further to us.

Hi everyone I am new on this site and have been extremely intrigued by the thread.
Thank you dianalynn for creating an account just to clear up a few things! Very much appreciated! I've been on a small lightening forum here and there, and no one ever mentions any of this information. I've never heard of not boiling the honey and water before!

I haven't used my drops in weeks. I'm upset at myself for it, but I haven't been to a store that has good honey yet (or when I am, I totally forget I need to buy it). One of my mom's patients owns a honey farm (?), and they have his honey at one of the local grocery stores here, so I'm going to try to find which store has it and get that. I'm almost 100% sure it's unpasteurized, because I remember having it before and it was so rich and sweet. MUCH better than the cheap honey they sell everywhere else I seem to go.

I've also discovered that my incredible eye pain is actually a symptom of dry eyes. However, my symptoms are much more severe than traditional dry eye, and seem to be the same type of symptoms that people with Lupus and Sjogren's get...so...that's unsettling...LUCKILY (as far as my dry eyes go), the holistic solution to dry eyes is.........HONEY! So I look forward to starting up my drops again! (And this time not boiling the water, I suppose.)
(26-03-2013, 02:21 PM)dianalynn Wrote: [ -> ]Hey all,

I'm new to these forums, and I decided to create an account in order to share some info I've gathered along the years, and hopefully clear up any misconceptions or questions that some of you who are just starting out may come across.

I've read a lot of misinformation on this thread, by people who are just trying to help and may not be aware of a few crucial things. I started using the honey/water recipe in 2008, and since then I've learned quite a bit from my mistakes, as well as from doing some research.
  • First and foremost, I would not advise anyone to use tap water or bottled water on their eyes. Tap water contains traces of a multitude of contaminants, even after boiled and filtered. This is why you want to use 100% pure H2O, which can likely be obtained at your local pharmacy, depending on where you live. Just look for distilled water. If you can't find it anywhere, you could resort to making your own distilled water at home by collecting the water vapor released from boiling water into a sterile container. Be careful not to burn yourself with the water vapor.

  • Most importantly, you do not want use regular supermarket-bought honey, even if they have an "organic" tag on them. This is often nothing more than a marketing gimmick. The type of honey you want to use is raw honey. Raw honey is pure, unprocessed, unpasteurized honey. You can usually tell them apart by looking at how milky the honey is. If the honey is very transparent and liquid, it's most likely pasteurized. Raw honey on the other hand tends to be very murky, opaque, and crystallizes faster than pasteurized honey. If your honey is fully or partially crystallized, it's still perfectly suitable for use.

  • Why should I use raw, non-pasteurized honey? Well it turns out that industrialized honey must look appealing to the customer, above all. Pasteurizing honey simply means that the honey is heated up to a very high temperature before being bottled. This serves to destroy yeast cells and delay the onset of crystallization in the honey.

  • So what if it's been heated up? All raw honey contains an enzyme called glucose oxidase. When honey is mixed with water (distilled water), This enzyme undergoes a reaction which produces hydrogen peroxide, which is the "bleaching" agent that lightens the color of your iris. However, when honey is heated up, this enzyme is destroyed, making pasteurized honey practically useless when it comes to its bleaching power. Using pasteurized honey will either delay your results or completely negate them.

  • Exposure to sunlight is a bad thing for both the honey and your honey/water solution (as well as your eyes!), since sunlight also destroys the honey's precious glucose oxidase. I was lucky to find a shop that sells raw honey directly from a farmer's market, where all bottles are kept in a cool, dark place. This is also something you should keep in mind when storing your honey jar and your solution container. No need to keep it in the fridge, unless it's really hot where you live.

  • What's the right honey/water mix? There isn't a rule-of-thumb ratio you should always use, as the most important factor is the resulting pH of your mixture. There are hundreds of types of honey out there, and they each have a different pH (between ~3 and ~5, they are all acidic). The glucose oxidase enzyme present in honey only produces hydrogen peroxide at pH levels between 5.5 and 7. This is why we have to mix water with the honey - it elevates the honey's pH, allowing the release of hydrogen peroxide. Since the pH of distilled water is 7 (neutral), high-pH honeys need less water in the mixture. Conversely, more acidic (lower pH) honeys need more water. You'll want your honey/water solution to have a pH as close to 5.5 as possible. The reason for this is because honey + water + the right pH is not all it takes for honey to release hydrogen peroxide. When the honey mixture comes in contact with your eyes, your tears will further elevate the pH of the solution to just the right level, on top of adding calcium (naturally present in tears) to the mix, which is essential to activate the glucose oxidase and break it down into hydrogen peroxide.

  • pH Test Strips These can be found at your local swimming pool shop. After preparing your honey/water solution, put a few drops of the mixture on the pH test strip. If the pH reads below ~5.5, add a more water. If it's above ~5.5, add more honey.

  • Do not boil the honey. Ever. Don't even mix it with hot or boiling water, or you'll destroy the honey's glucose oxidase. If your honey is crystallized or you're having trouble mixing it with water, you may heat up the water, but only to a lukewarm temperature in order to allow the honey to dissolve in the water.

  • Adding more honey to the mixture does not make the iris-lightening process go any faster. In fact it will either slow it down or not work at all. As we established above, the pH of the solution must be right so that hydrogen peroxide can be released. Adding too much honey will turn your solution too acidic, making it impossible to activate the glucose oxidase present in the honey and preventing the release of hydrogen peroxide.

  • What type of honey should I purchase? While there is no general rule of thumb on this, you'll want the honey with the highest concentration of glucose oxidase. This concentration depends on the type of flora the honey is derived from, the climate/weather, age and health of the bees, as well as the presence of pollutants such as herbicide/insecticide in the bee colony's habitat. Despite all this, it's generally accepted that (raw) Honeydew honey and Eucalyptus honey have some of the highest concentrations of this enzyme, although honeydew honey is more of a sure-shot in comparison to Eucalyptus honey.

  • Don't over-use it and don't over-dose. Stick to applying 2-3 drops per eye, 3 times a day, and leave your head facing up until the burning sensation ceases. Over-use of this mixture may cause eye irritation, which can lead to a more serious condition if used without moderation.

  • Clean out your eye-drop container at least once a week and sterilize it in boiling water (preferably distilled).
Im so stupid, i feel really bad now i should have given advice. Sad I sure i already caused some an eye infection. I didnt even know about those things. ill try to keep you up on my progress. Thanks for advice anyway i really should have known. Sad
Hello ladiesBig Grin I'm new to this forum but I hope with some of your help I can change my eye colour successfully. You see I have black eyes (yes they are that dark) and I want to lighten them to a hazel colour, hopefully this:http://api.ning.com/files/X21tpGL84hdGOxeJzwwYoe5TIG7*uuoCAaGoRqPO9Gd8pLF7KasH*cUF7O0pnyUfZlATugfuk1vATp77f*DhzhQBgu8zDNhv/ethan20hazel20eyes_1.jpg[img]http://[/img] so basically a greenish hazel. I know it will probably take a few years to get there but I just need to know that it is possible for me first before I embark on this crazy journey. As for genetics, I have 1 green eyed cousin, one hazel eyed cousin and my grandfather also happens to have hazel eyes.

Hello to you all again and I'm looking forward to sharing my progress with you!
Hello there,

Dianalynn, did you try honey/water eyedrops for long ?

You say very interesting things...
I've been using these eyedrops for about 1 month, with no big results I think. But I'm not discouraged.

The fact is I was using too much honey. 2 teaspoons of honey vs only 1 teaspoon of distilled water... So, ph too acidic.

I'm trying about 1 teaspoon of honey vs 3-4 teaspoons of distilled water now. I hope this will works.

Good luck to all of you for this long journey Wink
Hydrogen Peroxide does cause some damage to the eye in the process. Hydrogen peroxide solution 5% causes lasting damage to rabbit's eyes
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthguideline...ition.html
(just look up "eye" on the page)
I know using honey the concentration level is lower and a lot of people seem to have been safely succeeded, but you never know the effect of it in the long run. You may not be able to tell the difference in your sight after some minor damage caused by hydrogen peroxide has taken place, but what if it aggravate in the future?
Your sight should be prioritized.
I just started a week ago and my eyes were dark brown and by the next week which is today April 1st my eyes are lighter its very pretty, I am going for the hazel look and I hope it continues to keep it up Smile