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How should I go about making an appointment for Hormone Balance?
#1
I'm new to the whole "scheduling your pwn appointment thing" in general. I really want to get balanced again and getting professional advice for it. I want to be balanced to be healthy but I also want to breast growth. Should I mention to the doctor my NBE intentions or just ask for guidance? I would ask to get in contact with an endocrinologist, right? Of course I hope to mention that my estrogen is very high and the progesterone is supremely low and my testosterone is on the high averages (I will bring my hormone results).

Any advice?
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#2
(24-10-2017, 07:25 PM)Loverandfighter Wrote: I'm new to the whole "scheduling your pwn appointment thing" in general. I really want to get balanced again and getting professional advice for it. I want to be balanced to be healthy but I also want to breast growth. Should I mention to the doctor my NBE intentions or just ask for guidance? I would ask to get in contact with an endocrinologist, right? Of course I hope to mention that my estrogen is very high and the progesterone is supremely low and my testosterone is on the high averages (I will bring my hormone results).

Any advice?


You could ask and mention it if you like. But the thing is that the Doctor won't be in favor and say stuff like it doesn't work. Because they can ONLY comment on what they have studied. And generally, there's not a lot of research done on NBE and science looks down upon such methods. 
They aren't allowed to advice any stuff like this because what if something happens to you(like an allergic reaction or something) then they might get in trouble or something. This is just an assumption from my side.

You can ask for a hormone test if you like, I don't think there would be any issue with that.
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#3
A dr will likely poo poo over nbe and order basicbloods which won’t tell much.
I’d go straight to endo if possible. Look into Dutch hormone test too. It shows everything!
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#4
There are expensive saliva tests you can buy online and send them back later youll hear the results or you can go to the doctor tell him you suffer from hormonal related issues and say you want to have them tested. He or she might refuse or give you bloodtests which is not that reliable. And youll get charged anyhow.. I would personally go for online saliva kits.
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#5
Honestly, I don't see how asking for hormone testing would help here.

First problem-- When testing a woman's hormones, you need a minimum of TWO separate tests taken at specific times in your cycle, usually around Cycle Day 3 and around 7 days past ovulation.  That second test is often timed incorrectly even by doctors' offices who will take sample on Cycle Day 21 for everyone even though that isn't really 7 days past ovulation for everyone and for some women may be BEFORE ovulation.  (For example, for me that second test should be done absolutely no earlier than Cycle Day 23, and even that is too early most of the time.)  The test earlier in your cycle will show the levels of several other things, but the various estrogens will be higher then and progesterone will be nearly nonexistent.  Later in your cycle, progesterone will be in full power, and estrogen will be released in odd little surges.  In any case, if you don't get BOTH tests run, you cannot even begin to say whether your hormones are "in balance."  And since "balance" is what everyone goes on about for the sake of NBE, you can see how it would be a problem to just get a single hormone panel run.  You need to know if the progesterone phase of your cycle is balancing out the estrogen-heavy part.  And again, many doctors who are fertility specialists don't even run the second test at the right time for every patient-- so unless you are very in tune with your body, you will likely have even more trouble figuring out how to request things on your own.

Second problem--  If you go to a mainstream doctor for help, you're going to have to come up with excuses and stories to loop them into helping you because NBE is not a legit reason.  If your country has an insurance-based healthcare system, be aware that insurance may not cover some/all of your testing and appointments if you don't have a diagnosed issue.  If your country has a single-payer healthcare system, you may be bounced out entirely once the doc realizes you have no real issues.  It's not just about having real issues, it's a liability thing.  If they get any whiff that you're asking this questions so that you can fiddle around with all kinds of supplements and whatnot, they will basically HAVE TO advise you not to do all this.  It can be quite serious, and the side effects are not well known. So they can't appear to be aiding or endorsing your programs at all.  Someone could theoretically develop blood clots or something else quite serious like that by tampering with hormone balance.  That's why they won't help you to do this.

Third problem--  If you go to a mainstream doctor for help, you're going to have to pick the right one.  And this is assuming you've worked out the above problems with payment or being seen at all.  A general practitioner is typically utter CRAP about understanding hormonal balance issues.  Gynecologists, you would expect to be better about it, right?  Big old HELL NO.  While some of them do know a bit here and there, a pretty big percentage of OB/GYNs actually don't know some pretty basic things about female hormonal balances, like the fact that only 7% of women have that textbook 28-day cycle and in fact there is a wide variation of healthy balance.  OB/GYNs also famously will suggest women might have a yeast infection when they're just experiencing normal secretions.  So don't ask your OB/GYN for help to see if your hormones are in balance.  A fertility specialist is general a better option, but you would only see them if you have issues with fertility.  A standard endocrinologist is probably the most logical place to turn, but since that's a specialist, you have to have some pretty good excuses and symptoms to get in to see them in the first place.

Fourth problem-- The best option is probably some kind of a naturopath.  But the issue with this is finding a good one, and also payment.  No matter your healthcare system, you'll be paying out of pocket.  And a truly good science-based naturopath is pretty hard to find, let alone finding one that will be supportive of NBE goals.  To find one actually knowledgeable would be the next step above and beyond.  IME, qute a lot of naturopaths are quacks.  So it is really hard to just find a really good one in the first place.

Overall--  I think we have to acknowledge that what we're doing here is a lot of trial and error and also is undertaken at our own risk outside of the recommendations of any medical personnel.  I am well aware that's what I'm doing.  I'm staying alert to whatever side effects I can tell and trying to stay prepared to shift strategies as needed.  But I fully get that my strategies may not work and that I might actually create some problems with my trial and error.  It's all just part of this path that I am choosing.
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